Silva Lab

Matthew Silva, Ph.D

Julia and Walter R. Peterson Orthopaedic Research Professor

Department of Orthopaedics Washington University

silvam@wustl.edu
BJC - Institute of Health
11th floor - RM 11619
Phone: (314) 747-3772

Click here to visit the Musculoskeletal Structure and Strength website.

Grants

ONGOING RESEARCH SUPPORT

SILVA (Co-Director)
5/11/2009 - 3/31/2019
NIH/NIAMS - P30 AR057235
“Core Center for Musculoskeletal Biology and Medicine”
Associate Director of the Center and directs Core B, which supports evaluation of musculoskeletal structure and strength in mouse models.
http://www.musculoskeletalcore.wustl.edu/content/Core/2974/B-Structure-and-Strength-Core/Services/Overview.aspx

SILVA (PI) 7/25/03-2/29/20
NIH/NIAMS - R01 AR050211
“Osteogenic and Angiogenic Response to Skeletal Loading”
Determine the mechano-biological pathways that lead to bone formation after mechanical loading.

SILVA (PI)
7/13/2001 – 3/31/2016
NIH/NIAMS - R01 AR047867
“Response of the Osteoporotic Skeleton to in Vivo Loading”
Our goals are to assess the responsiveness of the osteoporotic skeleton to increased mechanical loading using mouse models of aging, with focus on the roles of osteoblast recruitment and Wnt signaling.

SILVA (PI)
04/01/2015 – 03/31/2017
NIH/NIAMS - R21 AR067958
An Improved Stress Fracture Model to Study Drug Effects on Bone Damage Repair
The goal of this project is to develop a novel stress fracture model with features of an atypical femur fracture.

SILVA (PI)
10/2015 – 09/2017
Merck Investigator Studies Program
“A Rabbit Model of Cyclic Mechanical Loading to Investigate Drug-Bone Interactions”
Develop a new model of bone mechanical loading in the rabbit forelimb.

SILVA (Co-Investigator)
08/01/2006 – 03/31/2017
NIH/NICHD - R01 HD049808
Enhanced Tendon Healing through Growth Factor and Cell Therapies
Determine effects of growth factors with cells in tendon repair.

SILVA (Co-Investigator)
09/01/2008 – 08/31/2018
NIH/NIAMS - R01 AR062947
“Enhanced Tendon Healing through Growth Factor and Cell Therapies
Determine effects of growth factors with cells in tendon repair.

SILVA (Co-Investigator)
09/01/2008 – 08/31/2018
NIH/NIAMS - R01 AR041255
“Connexin 43 in Bone Formation
Determine the role of connexin 43 in osteoblast function and bone response to mechanical loading.

SILVA (PI)
07/01/2015 – 05/31/2017
NIH/NIAMS -R21 AR066798A
“The Effects of Systemic Hedgehog Pathway Modulation on Fracture Healing
Assess the role of hedgehog (Hh) signaling in diaphyseal fracture healing.

SILVA (Co-Investigator)
07/2015 – 06/2018
OREF
“The Effects of Systemic Hedgehog Pathway Modulation on Fracture Healing
Evaluate potential of Hedgehog agonist treatment to accelerate metaphyseal fracture healing.

SILVA (Co-Investigator)
01/01/2016 – 12/31/2017
Shriner’s Hospitals for Children - #85800
“Development of a Murine Model of Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)
Develop an animal model of knee OCD and determine the role of joint loading in OCD healing or progression.

COMPLETED RESEARCH SUPPORT

“Indian hedgehog signaling in osteoblast differentiation”
Role: Co-Investigator (PI: Long), Agency: NIH/NIDDK; R01 DK065789, April 2009-March 2014
Elucidate the molecular mechanism through which Hh controls osteoblast differentiation, as well as the potential roles of Hh signaling in bone homeostasis and fracture repair in the adult.

“Mechanobiology of Rotator Cuff Development”
Role: Co-Investigator (PI: Thomopoulos), Agency: NIH/NIAMS; R01 AR055580, July 2009-June 2014
Study the mechanobiology of tendon enthesis development using mouse models.

“FGFs Signaling in Skeletal Development, Homeostasis and Aging”
Role: Co-Investigator (PI: D. Ornitz), Agency: NIH/NICHD; R01 HD049808, Feb. 2012-Jan. 2017
Determine the role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in post-natal bone growth and homeostasis.

“Metabolic Skeletal Disorders Training Program Grant”
Role: Co-Director (PI: R. Civitelli), Agency: NIH/NIAMS; T32 AR060719, 2011-2016
Support three pre-and post-doctoral trainees in skeletal disorders research at Washington University.
http://bmd.dom.wustl.edu/education/t32-training-program.html

“Connexin 43 in bone formation”
Role: Co-Investigator (PI: Civitelli), Agency: NIH/NIAMS; R01 AR041255, Sept 2013-Dec 2017 (renewal)
Determine the role of connexin 43 in osteoblast function and bone response to mechanical loading.